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|          International                              /|oo \         |
|       FidoNet Association                          (_|  /_)        |
|                                                     _`@/_ \    _   |
|                                                    |     | \   \\  |
|         P. O. Box 41143                            | (*) |  \   )) |
|      Saint Louis, MO 63141            ______       |__U__| /  \//  |
|     United States of America         / FIDO \       _//|| _\   /   |
|                                     (________)     (_/(_|(____/    |
|                                                          (tm)      |
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                             F I D O N E T

                      Policy and Procedures Guide
                            European version
                               Version 4

                    * * *   P R O P O S A L   * * *



_______                                                           ____Section                                                           Page

1 Overview  ......................................................   1
  1.1 The Levels of FidoNet  .....................................   1
  1.2 Coordinators  ..............................................   2
2 Sysop Procedures  ..............................................   4
  2.1 How to get a node number  ..................................   5
  2.2 If you are going down  .....................................   5
  2.3 How to form a network  .....................................   6
3 Coordinator Procedures  ........................................   7
  3.1 Administrative tasks  ......................................   7
      3.1.1 Maintaining the node list  ...........................   7
      3.1.2 Assigning node numbers  ..............................   8
      3.1.3 Problem resolution  ..................................   8
       3.1.4 Formulating local policy  ...........................   9
  3.2 Node list distribution  ....................................   9
  3.3 Newsletter distribution  ...................................   9
  3.4 Network mail distribution  .................................   9
  3.5 Anything else  .............................................   9
  3.6 Specific coordinator procedures  ...........................  10
      3.6.1 International Coordinator procedures  ................  10
      3.6.2 Zone Coordinator procedures  .........................  10
      3.6.3 Regional Coordinator procedures  .....................  11
      3.6.4 Network Coordinator procedures  ......................  12
      3.6.5 Hub Coordinator procedures  ..........................  13
4 Resolution of Disputes  ........................................  14
  4.1 Case Histories  ............................................  14
      4.1.1 The Case of the Crooked Node  ........................  14
      4.1.2 The Case of the Hacker Mailer  .......................  15
      4.1.3 The Case of the Network Mutiny  ......................  15
      4.1.4 The Case of the Bothered Barker  .....................  15
      4.1.5 The Case of the Busy Beaver  .........................  16
      4.1.6 The Case of the Sysop Twit  ..........................  16
      4.1.7 The Case of the EchoMail Junkey key key  .............  16
      4.1.8 The Case of the Bouncing Board  ......................  16
                               Chapter 1                               Chapter 1

                               OVERVIEW                               OVERVIEW



FidoNet is an amateur electronic mail system.  As  such,  all  of  its
participants  and  operators  are non-paid volunteers.  From its early
beginnings as a few friends swapping messages back and forth,  it  has
now grown to  (August  1987)  over  2000  different  systems  on  four
continents.

FidoNet  is  large  enough that it would quickly fall apart of its own
weight unless some sort of structure and control were imposed  on  it.
Multinet  operation  provides the structure.  Decentralized management
provides the control.  This document is an  attempt  to  describe  the
procedures which have been developed to manage the network.



1.1     The Levels of FidoNet1.1     The Levels of FidoNet

FidoNet nodes are grouped on several levels.  These are as follows:

o   FidoNeto   FidoNet; This indicates the entire public amateur mail network, as
    administered by the  International  FidoNet  Association,  and  as
    defined by the weekly node list.

o   Zones     ____o   Zones;  A zone is a large geographic area containing many regions,
    and covering one or more countries and/or continents.

o   Regions     ______o   Regions;  A region is a well defined  geographic  area  containing
    nodes  which  may or may not be combined into networks.  A typical
                                                           ___________    region will contain many nodes in networks,  and a few independent
    _____    nodes, which are not a part of any network.

o   Networks      _______o   Networks;  A  network  is  a  collection  of  nodes,  usually in a
    relatively small geographic area.  Networks coordinate their  mail
    activity to decrease cost and increase mail throughput.

o   Hubs     ___o   Hubs;  A hub is a subdivision of a network that assists in network
    management  by  routing  mail  to,  and  by  coordinating  for,  a
    collection of nodes in that network.  In general only  the  larger
    networks will have hubs.

o   Nodes      ____o   Nodes;  A  node  is a single FidoNet address,  and is the smallest
    recognized unit of FidoNet.

o   Points    _____o   Points; A point is a node on a private network which is accessible
    through a node on FidoNet.









FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 1
1.2     Coordinators1.2     Coordinators

                                                       ___________Each subdivision  at  each  level  is  managed  by  a  coordinator.  A
coordinator  is  a  person  who  coordinates  the technical aspects of
network mail.  This entails both administrative and  technical  tasks,
which  will  be described later.  The following levels of coordinators
are currently recognized:

o   The  International  Coordinatoro   The  International  Coordinator;   The  International  Coordinator
    compiles all of the node lists from all of the regions and creates
    the master node list, which is then distributed over FidoNet.

o   The  Zone  Coordinatoro   The  Zone  Coordinator;  A  Zone Coordinator maintains the list of
    administrative nodes in his zone and accepts node lists  from  the
    Regional  Coordinators  in  his  zone.  He compiles these lists to
    create a zone node list,  which he then sends to the International
    Coordinator  for  inclusion  in  the  master  node  list.  A  Zone
                                                         ____ ________    Coordinator  is  also responsible for overseeing any zone gateways
    in his zone.

o   The Regional Coordinatoro   The Regional Coordinator;  A Regional  Coordinator  maintains  the
    list  of  independent  nodes  in his region and accepts node lists
    from the Network Coordinators in his  region.  He  compiles  these
    lists to create a regional node list for his region, which he then
    sends  to  his  Zone Coordinator.  A Regional Coordinator does not
    perform routing services for any nodes in his region.

o   The Network Coordinatoro   The Network Coordinator;  A Network Coordinator maintains the list
    of  any  nodes  in  his  network  that are not served by a hub and
    accepts node lists from the Hub Coordinators in  his  network.  He
    compiles  these  lists  to  create  a  network  node  list for his
    network,  which he then  sends  to  his  Regional  Coordinator.  A
    Network  Coordinator  is  also responsible for forwarding any mail
    addressed to nodes in his network.

o   The Hub Coordinatoro   The Hub Coordinator; A Hub Coordinator maintains the list of nodes
    in his hub  and  sends  it  to  his  Network  Coordinator.  A  Hub
    Coordinator  is also responsible for forwarding any mail addressed
    to nodes in his hub.

o   The Point Coordinatoro   The Point Coordinator; Any node in FidoNet can act as a gateway to
                                    ___    __    a point network.  The Sysop (or system operator) of that node then
    acts as the coordinator for his point network.

o   The Sysopo   The Sysop; A Sysop formulates his own policy for running his board
    and dealing with his users,  so that will not be discussed in this
    document.  However,  a  Sysop  must also mesh with the rest of the
                                                               ____    FidoNet system if he is to send and receive mail, and that will be
    discussed here.


These levels act to  distribute  the  administration  and  control  of
FidoNet  to  the  lowest  possible  level,  while  still  allowing for
coordinated action over the  entire  mail  system.  Administration  is
made  possible  by operating in a strict top-down manner.  That is,  a
                                                  __coordinator at any given  level  is  responsible  to  the  coordinator
                                       ___immediately above him, and responsible for everyone below him.


FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 2
For example,  a Regional Coordinator is solely responsible to his Zone
Coordinator for anything that may or may not  happen  in  his  region.
From  the  point  of  view  of  the  Zone  Coordinator,  the  Regional
Coordinator is totally  and  completely  responsible  for  the  smooth
operation  of  his  region.  Likewise,  from  the point of view of the
Regional  Coordinator,   the  Network  Coordinators  are  totally  and
completely responsible for the smooth operation of their networks.

If  a coordinator at any level above sysop is unable for any reason to
properly perform his duties,  he can be replaced by his coordinator at
the next level up.  For example,  if a Regional Coordinator is failing
to  perform  his  duties,  then his Zone Coordinator can appoint a new
Regional Coordinator to replace him.

The primary responsibility of any coordinator is technical  management
of  network  operations.  Management decisions should be made strictly
on technical grounds.










































FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 3
                               Chapter 2                               Chapter 2

                           SYSOP PROCEDURES                           SYSOP PROCEDURES



A sysop of an individual node can pretty much do  as  he  pleases,  as
long  as  he observes the mail events,  is not excessively annoying to
other  nodes  on  FidoNet,  and  does  not promote the distribution of
pirated copyrighted software.

National  Mail  Hour is the heart of FidoNet,  as this is when network
mail is passed between systems.  Any system which wishes to be a  part
            ____of  FidoNet must be able to receive mail at this time.  A system which
is a member of a network may also be required  to  observe  additional
mail events, as defined by his Network Coordinator.

Failure  to  observe  the proper mail events is sufficient grounds for
any node to be dropped from FidoNet without notice  (since  notice  is
generally given by FidoNet mail).

Network mail systems generally operate unattended and place  calls  at
odd hours of the night.  If a system tries to call an incorrect or out
of  date  number,  it could cause some poor citizen's phone to ring in
the wee hours of the  morning,  much  to  the  annoyance  of  innocent
bystanders and civil authorities.  For this reason,  a sysop who sends
mail is obligated to obtain and use the most  recent  edition  of  the
node list as is practical.


A system which has been  dropped  from  the  network  is  said  to  be
______________excommunicated (i.e.  unable to communicate).  A node which  has  been
excommunicated may or may not be listed for a time in the "dog house",
which is included in the comments at the end of the node list.  If you
find  that  you  have  been excommunicated without warning,  then that
means that your coordinator was unable  to  contact  you.  You  should
rectify the problem and report back.

The  exact  timing  of  National Mail Hour is set for each zone by the
Zone  Coordinator.  In  zone 2 National  Mail  Hour  is
observed from 0230 to 0330 GMT every day,  weekends included.

               ___FidoNet  does  not  observe  daylight  savings  time.  In  areas which
observe daylight savings time  the  FidoNet  mail  schedules  must  be
adjusted  in  the  same direction as the clock change.  Alternatively,
you can simply leave your system on standard time.






FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 4
2.1     How to get a node number2.1     How to get a node number

You  must  first obtain a current node list so that you can send mail.
You do not need a node number to send mail,  but you must have one  in
order for others to send mail to you.

The first step in obtaining a current node list is to locate a FidoNet
bulletin board.  No help there;  you're on  your  own.  Most  bulletin
board lists include at  least  a  few  FidoNet  systems,  and  usually
identify them as such, so this shouldn't be too hard.

If the sysop of any FidoNet system does not have a node list available
for downloading, then he can probably tell you where to get one.

Once  you  have  a node list,  you must determine which coordinator to
apply to.  The coordinator of any network or  region  is  always  node
zero  of  that  network  or  region.  A Hub Coordinator will always be
indicated in the node list by a "HUB" prefix.

You should apply to the  lowest-level  coordinator  that  covers  your
area.  For  example,  if  you are located within the hub of a network,
then you would apply to the Hub Coordinator.  If there is  no  network
that  covers  your  area,   then  you  would  apply  to  the  Regional
Coordinator for your region.

                                   ____Your application for a node number must be sent to the coordinator  by
                  ____FidoNet mail, and must include at least the following:

    1) Your name.
    2) The name of your system.
    3) The city and state where your system is located.
    4) The phone number to be used when calling your system.
    5) Your hours of operation.
    6) The maximum baud rate you can support.

Your coordinator may want  additional  information.  If  so,  he  will
contact  you.  Please  allow  at  least  two to three weeks for a node
number request to be processed.


2.2     If you are going down2.2     If you are going down

If  your  node will be down for an extended period (more than a day or
                                              __ ____ __ ________two), then you should inform your coordinator as soon as possible.  If
you do not do this,  then other systems will still try  to  reach  you
                                                          __ ___ _____while  you are down,  much to the annoyance of everyone.  Do not under
___  _____________any  circumstances  put an answering machine or similar device on your
phone line while you are down.  If you do,  then calling systems  will
get  the  machine repeatedly,  racking up large phone bills,  which is
____                               Resolution of Disputesvery annoying.  See the section on Resolution of Disputes for  details
on what happens to annoying people.

If  you  will be leaving your system unattended for an extended period
of time (such as while you are on vacation),  you should  notify  your
coordinator.  Systems  do have a tendency to "crash" now and then,  so
you will probably want your coordinator to know that it is a temporary
condition if it happens while you are away.


FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 5
2.3     How to form a network2.3     How to form a network

If there are several nodes in your area,  but no network, then you may
wish to form your own.  You may also be requested to form a network by
your Regional Coordinator.

Your first step is to contact the other sysops in your area.  You must
decide which nodes will comprise the network, and which of those nodes
is  going  to be the Network Coordinator.  Your next step is to inform
your Regional Coordinator.  You must send him a FidoNet  message  with
the following information:


1) The  region  number(s),  or  network  number(s)  if  a  network  is
   splitting  up,  that are affected by the formation of your network.
   The Regional  Coordinator  will  inform  the  coordinators  of  any
   affected networks that a new network is in formation.

2) The  name that you wish to call your network.  Please try to select
   a  name  that relates to your grouping.  For example,  SoCalNet for
   nodes  in  the   Southern   California   Area   and   MassNet   for
   Massachusettes  Area.  Remember  if  you  call  yourself  DOGNET it
   doesn't help others know what area of the  country  (or  even  what
   country) your group is in.

3) A  copy  of  the  proposed  network's  nodelist.  The nodelist file
   should be named Frrr-nnn.NET  where  rrr  is  the  proposed  host's
   current  region  or  network  number  and  nnn  is his current node
   number.  For example,  if the proposed host is currently listed  as
   node  5  in  region 13,  then you would name the file F013-005.NET.
   This file should be sent attached to the message of Application for
   a Network Number.


                 SAMPLE FORMAT OF A Frrr-nnn.NET FILE

Host,xxx,St_Louis_Area, St_Louis_MO,Ken_Kaplan,    1-314-432-4129,2400
Pvt ,076,Ben's_Bakery,  Godfrey_IL, Ben_Baker,     -Unpublished-, 1200
    ,482,Dirty_Ole_Man, Wood_Riv_IL,Ervin_Cole,    1-618-254-2763,1200
    ,010,MDC_RCC,       St_Louis_MO,Terry_Mueller, 1-314-232-6881,2400
    ,016,Mikes_Board,   St_Louis_MO,Mike_Mellinger,1-314-726-3448,2400
    ,022,PCLUG,         St_Louis_MO,Ken_Kaplan,    1-314-576-2743,2400
    ,051,DECUS_Central, St_Louis_MO,Ken_Kaplan,    1-314-432-4129,2400
    ,339,Midnight_Cnct, St_Louis_MO,Ray_Weil,      1-314-961-1585,1200
Pvt ,492,Neu's_Node,    Omaha_NB,   Paul_Neu,      -Unpublished-, 2400
Pvt ,500,Alex'_Fido,    St_Louis_MO,Alex_Hartley,  -Unpublished-, 1200
    ,501,ZIGGY's_Castle,Fenton_MO,  Mike_Cravens,  1-314-225-9684,1200
    ,502,ALADINs_Castle,St_Louis_MO,Bob_Russ,      1-314-741-3050,1200

                                      ___Granting  of  a  network  number  is  not  automatic.   Your  Regional
Coordinator  will  review  your  application  and  inform  you  of his
decision.

______Do not send a network number request to the Zone Coordinator.
                                ____All  network  number  requests  must  be  processed  by  the  Regional
Coordinator.



FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 6
                               Chapter 3                               Chapter 3

                        COORDINATOR PROCEDURES                        COORDINATOR PROCEDURES



This  chapter describes the procedures followed by all coordinators at
all levels.  Later we will go into more  detail  on  those  procedures
which are specific to any given type of coordinator.


All  coordinators  have  four  primary duties.  In order of decreasing
importance, they are:

    1) Administrative tasks.

    2) Node list distribution.

    3) Newsletter distribution.

    4) Network mail distribution.

At first glance it would seem that network mail distribution should be
the highest priority,  since after all  that's  why  we're  running  a
network in the first place.  But the first three priorities are needed
to  ensure  smooth  operation  of  the network,  and hence must have a
higher priority.



3.1     Administrative tasks3.1     Administrative tasks

First  and  foremost,  every  coordinator is also the sysop of his own
node.  It must be possible for others to reach you  by  network  mail.
So  in  addition  to  the other tasks of a coordinator,  you must also
observe all of the requirements for being a node.



3.1.1   Maintaining the node list3.1.1   Maintaining the node list

A coordinator at any level must maintain his portion of the node list.
Almost any coordinator will have some nodes in his node list which are
not a part of any subgroup.  For  example,  a  Zone  Coordinator  must
maintain  a list of administrative nodes for his zone,  and a Regional
Coordinator must maintain a list of independent nodes in  his  region.
A  Hub  Coordinator  (or  the Network Coordinator in a network without
hubs) must maintain the list of all nodes in his area.

A  coordinator is responsible for seeing to it that his portion of the
node  list  is  kept  reasonably  accurate.   You  should  attempt  to
implement  name  changes,  phone number changes,  and so forth in this
node list as soon as possible.  You should also  check  from  time  to
time  to  ensure  that  all of the listed nodes are in fact capable of
accepting network mail.  How best to accomplish this is left  to  your
discretion.



FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 7
3.1.2   Assigning node numbers3.1.2   Assigning node numbers

You may assign node numbers to new nodes in your list, but keep in
mind the following:

1) It is your responsibility to ensure that the node number you assign
   is unique within that region or network.

2) You should try to avoid assigning node  numbers  when  an  existing
   subdivision  of  your  area  already covers the location of the new
   node.  For example,  a Regional Coordinator  should  try  to  avoid
   assigning independent nodes in a city that has its own network.

You may also change the numbers of existing nodes in your area, though
you should check with the respective nodes before doing so.

You should not under any circumstances assign a  node  number  to  any
system  until  you  have received a formal request from that system by
FidoNet mail.  This will ensure that the system is at least  minimally
operational.  The  strict  maintenance  of this policy has been one of
the great strengths of FidoNet.

It  is  also recommended,  though not required,  that you call a board
which is applying for a node number before assigning it a node number.

You should use network mail to inform a new node of his  node  number,
as this helps to insure that he is capable of receiving network mail.



3.1.3   Problem resolution3.1.3   Problem resolution

From time to time you may be called on to resolve a  problem  in  your
area.  This  could be a technical problem relating to the four primary
duties of a coordinator,  or it could be related to annoying behaviour
on the part of someone in your area.

If the problem is caused by a node or a coordinator immediately  under
you, then it is your responsibility to resolve the problem in whatever
manner you deem fit.  If the problem is in a subdivision of your area,
then  you  should  first  refer it to the appropriate coordinator.  If
that coordinator does not resolve the problem satisfactorily, then you
can appoint a replacement.
















FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 8
3.1.4   Formulating local policy3.1.4   Formulating local policy

It  is  your  responsibility to formulate any local policies which are
required for the smooth operation of your assigned area.  Any policies
you establish must not conflict with any  policies  established  by  a
coordinator above you or with this policy document.



3.2     Node list distribution3.2     Node list distribution

The node list is posted weekly on Saturday,  along with a  "difference
file"  giving  the changes for the week.  It is your responsibility to
obtain the difference file from your coordinator  every  week  and  to
distribute   it   to  the  coordinators  below  you.   The  method  of
distribution is left to your discretion.  It is  also  desirable  that
you make it available for downloading by the general user, but this is
not required.



3.3     Newsletter distribution3.3     Newsletter distribution

                       ________The newsletter, called FidoNews,  is published weekly on Monday and is
distributed as an archive named FNEWSvnn.ARC,  where "v" is the volume
number and "nn" is the issue number.  It  is  your  responsibility  to
obtain this archive from your coordinator every week and to distribute
it  to the coordinators below you.  The method of distribution is left
to your discretion.  It is also desirable that you make  it  available
for  downloading  by  the  general user in both archived an unarchived
form, but this is not required.



3.4     Network mail distribution3.4     Network mail distribution

It is your responsibility to ensure that network mail in your area  is
operating  in  an  acceptable manner.  Exactly what this involves will
depend on what level you are at,  and will be discussed in more detail
below.



3.5     Anything else3.5     Anything else

You should encourage sysops and users in your region to contribute  to
FidoNews.  If you receive any submissions,  you should forward them to
the FidoNews publisher.  Think of yourself as being a regional  bureau
chief on the FidoNews editorial staff.

FidoNews  and  the  node  list  are  the  glue that holds us together.
Without them,  we cease to be a community,  and  become  just  another
random collection of bulletin boards.






FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***              Page 9
3.6     Specific coordinator procedures3.6     Specific coordinator procedures

The   above   outlines  the  procedures  which  are  followed  by  all
coordinators.  We will now discuss additional procedures  followed  by
specific types of coordinators.



3.6.1   International Coordinator procedures3.6.1   International Coordinator procedures

The  International  Coordinator is appointed by the Board of Directors
of the International FidoNet Association, Inc.  The Board of Directors
can appoint a replacement for the  International  Coordinator  at  any
time.

The  International  Coordinator is responsible for format of the node-
list and the update files.

The  International  Coordinator  is  responsible for allocating zones,
assigning zone numbers,  and for appointing the Zone  Coordinator  for
each zone.

3.6.2   Zone Coordinator procedures3.6.2   Zone Coordinator procedures

A  Zone Coordinator is responsible for dividing his zone into regions,
assigning region numbers,  and for appointing the Regional Coordinator
for each region.  A Zone Coordinator also assigns a pool of numbers to
each Regional Coordinator for use in assigning network numbers.

A Zone Coordinator is responsible for locating nodes willing to act as
____ _____zone gates for passing mail between his zone and the other  zones,  if
at  all possible.  A Zone Coordinator should not appoint any node as a
zone gate unless the sysop of that node is willing and able to provide
reasonably reliable interzone mail.  Zone gates are highly  desirable,
                     ____but if provided they must be reasonably reliable.

A  Zone  Coordinator maintains the list of administrative nodes within
his zone.  The administrative nodes will always have a  region  number
the  same  as the zone number.  For example,  the administrative nodes
for Zone 3 will always be in Region 3.

A Zone Coordinator may use administrative node addresses for  whatever
he  likes,  except  that  any node number which is the same as another
zone number is reserved for the zone gate to that zone.  For  example,
in  Zone  3  the network address "3/2" is reserved for use by the zone
gate that passes mail from Zone 3 to Zone 2.

                       ___A Zone Coordinator may not assign a region number that is the same  as
any other zone number.  This is because administrative regions are, by
definition, present in all zones.


A zone coordinator is responsible for the weekly zone and world nodelist
to be published in his zone on Saturdays.


FidoNet Policy and Procedures   *** PROPOSAL ***             Page 10
3.6.3   Regional Coordinator procedures3.6.3   Regional Coordinator procedures

A  Regional  Coordinator  is  responsible  for approving new networks,
assigning network numbers,  and for appointing a  Network  Coordinator
for each network.

Each  Regional  Coordinator  will be assigned a pool of numbers to use
when assigning network numbers.  A Regional Coordinator  should  never
assign a network number outside of this pool,  and should never assign
the same number to more than one network.  If a  Regional  Coordinator
assigns  all  of the numbers in his pool,  he should apply to his Zone
Coordinator for additional numbers.

A  Regional Coordinator should try to avoid the needless proliferation
of networks.  Networks should not be allocated on any basis other than
technical  and  practical  considerations  relating  to  network  mail
operations.  For example, persons wishing to establish networks on the
basis of special interests or for company mail should be encouraged to
investigate  the alternatives,  such as echomail conferences and point
networks.

A  Regional  Coordinator  is  responsible  for maintaining the list of
independent nodes within his region.  This will consist  primarily  of
those  nodes  which  are  not within the coverage area of any network.
                                                       ___There are, however,  certain cases where a node should not be a member
of  a  network,  such  as  a  commercial system with a large volume of
traffic which would clog the network.  The resolution of such  special
cases is left to your own discretion.

If  several  independent nodes in a region are in a "clump",  then the
Regional Coordinator should  encourage  or  require  them  to  form  a
                                                forming  a networknetwork.  Refer  to  the  sysop  procedure  on  forming  a network for
more details.

                     ___Note that this does  not  mean  that  a  Regional  Coordinator  should
encourage the formation of trivial networks.  Obviously, one node does
not  make  a  network.  The  exact  number  of  nodes  required for an
effective network must be judged according to the circumstances of the
situation, and is left to the discretion of the Regional Coordinator.

It is the responsibility of a Regional Coordinator to ensure that  the
networks  within  his  region  are  operating in an acceptible manner.
          ___This does not mean that he is required to operate those networks; that
is the responsibility of the Network Coordinators.  It means  that  he
is  responsible  for seeing to it that the Network Coordinators within
his region are acting responsibly.

A Regional Coordinator is obligated to maintain direct and  reasonably
frequent contact with the networks in his region.  The exact method of
accomplishing   this  is  left  to  the  discretion  of  the  Regional
Coordinator.








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3.6.4   Network Coordinator procedures3.6.4   Network Coordinator procedures

A Network Coordinator is responsible for assigning node numbers to any
nodes  within  his network which are not managed by a Hub Coordinator.
A Network Coordinator is also  responsible  for  allocating  any  hubs
within  his network and for appointing a Hub Coordinator for each hub.
If a Network Coordinator assigns any Hub Coordinators,  then  he  also
assigns a pool of numbers to each Hub Coordinator for use in assigning
node numbers.

It  is  the  responsibility  of  a  Network Coordinator to receive all
inbound mail for nodes in  his  network  and  to  forward  it  to  its
recipients.  How  to  accomplish this is left to the discretion of the
Network Coordinator.  However, there are a few exceptions:

1) Once in awhile a node will try to make a "bombing run" (sending one
   message to a great many nodes).  Bombing runs are considered to  be
   annoying, and may be dealt with accordingly.

2) Occasionally  a  user  will  appear  who  receives  a great deal of
   traffic.  If a single node is receiving enough  mail  to  interfere
   with  mail  delivery  to  the other nodes in his network,  then his
   Network Coordinator can refer him to his Regional  Coordinator  for
   reassignment as an independent node.

3) The most common source of routing overload  is  echomail.  Echomail
   is  a nice invention,  and offers great benefits,  but it cannot be
   allowed to degrade the ability of FidoNet to handle normal  message
   traffic.  If  a  node  in  a  network  is  routing large volumes of
   echomail,  the sysop can be asked to either  limit  the  amount  of
   echomail,  or  even  to  stop routing his echomail completely.  The
   design of echomail is such that it is a simple matter to do  either
   of these.

A Network Coordinator is responsible for assigning any additional mail
events  which  may be required for operation of his network.  Any node
in a network may  be  excommunicated  for  failing  to  observe  these
additional mail events.

                                                  ________ _______A  Network  Coordinator may appoint a node as the outbound gateway for
his network if he so desires and if one  can  be  found.  In  no  case
should  a node be appointed as an outbound gateway unless the sysop of
that node is willing and able to provide reasonably reliable  service.
                                   ___Note that a Network Coordinator is not required to appoint an outbound
gateway.  If  a  Network  Coordinator  chooses  to appoint an outbound
gateway,  then it is left to the Network Coordinator to establish  any
rules, policies, and procedures relating to its use.












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3.6.5   Hub Coordinator procedures3.6.5   Hub Coordinator procedures

A  Hub  Coordinator is responsible for assigning node numbers to nodes
in his area.  Each Hub Coordinator will be assigned a pool of  numbers
to  use  when  assigning node numbers.  A Hub Coordinator should never
assign a node number outside of this pool, and should never assign the
same number to more than one node.  If a Hub Coordinator  assigns  all
of the numbers in his pool, he should apply to his Network Coordinator
for additional numbers.

It  is  the responsibility of a Hub Coordinator to receive all inbound
mail for nodes in his hub and to forward it to its recipients.  How to
accomplish this is left to the  discretion  of  the  Hub  Coordinator.
However, the same exceptions apply here as for a Network Coordinator.

A  Hub  Coordinator  may  have  additional duties,  as assigned by his
Network Coordinator.










































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                               Chapter 4                               Chapter 4

                        RESOLUTION OF DISPUTES                        RESOLUTION OF DISPUTES



The  world  not  being  perfect,  sometimes  troubles  crop  up.   Any
organization larger than a cub scout pack needs some sort of grievance
procedure, and FidoNet is no exception.

The FidoNet judicial philosophy can be summed up in two rules:

       Thou shalt not excessively annoy others.    1) Thou shalt not excessively annoy others.

       Thou shalt not be too easily annoyed.    2) Thou shalt not be too easily annoyed.

In  other  words,  there  are  no hard and fast rules of conduct,  but
                                                                  ____reasonably polite behavior is expected.  Also,  in  any  dispute  both
sides  are examined,  and action could be taken against either or both
parties. ("Judge not, lest ye be judged!")

In  any  case  of  annoying  behavior the person to complain to is the
coordinator of the person who is annoying you.  For  example,  if  you
have a problem with a point or a user you would complain to his sysop,
or  if  you  have  a  problem  with  a  Regional Coordinator you would
complain to his Zone Coordinator, and so on.

If the coordinator you complain to fails to resolve the problem,  then
                        ___you  can  complain  to  his  coordinator.  For  example,  if you had a
problem with a Hub  Coordinator,  you  would  first  complain  to  his
Network Coordinator.  Then if the Network Coordinator does not resolve
the problem, you would complain to his Regional Coordinator.

Do  not ever skip over a coordinator when filing a complaint.  That in
itself is annoying.



4.1     Case Histories4.1     Case Histories

A  few  actual  case  histories of past disputes may be instructive to
show general procedures and methods.  Names  have  been  left  out  to
protect the guilty.



4.1.1   The Case of the Crooked Node4.1.1   The Case of the Crooked Node

A  sysop of a local node was using network mail to engage in unethical
business practices.  His Network Coordinator became  very  annoyed  at
this, and dropped the local from his node list.

The  local  appealed  to his Regional Coordinator for assignment as an
independent node.  The Regional  Coordinator,  on  checking  with  the
Network  Coordinator,  decided that the Network Coordinator was within
his rights to be annoyed.  Independent status was denied.



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4.1.2   The Case of the Hacker Mailer4.1.2   The Case of the Hacker Mailer

A sysop of a local node made use of file attaches for extra  users  to
mail  himself the USER.BBS file from several local boards.  The sysops
of these boards felt annoyed at this,  and appealed to  their  Network
Coordinator,  who  agreed and dropped the offending node from the node
list.

The Regional Coordinator was not consulted.

The International Coordinator did not intervene.



4.1.3   The Case of the Network Mutiny4.1.3   The Case of the Network Mutiny

Several local nodes became annoyed with their Network Coordinator  for
failing to provide services.  They complained to him,  but nothing was
done.

They appealed to their Regional Coordinator,  who  decided  that  they
were justified in their annoyance and accepted their application for a
new network number.



4.1.4   The Case of the Bothered Barker4.1.4   The Case of the Bothered Barker

A local node became annoyed with his Network Coordinator  for  failing
to  provide  services.  Repeated complaints to his Network Coordinator
did not satisfy him, so he appealed to the International Coordinator.

The International Coordinator, on seeing that the Regional Coordinator
had not been consulted, dismissed the complaint out of hand.

The local node submitted his complaint to  his  Regional  Coordinator,
who  investigated  the case and discovered that there was some justice
to the complaint.  He advised and assisted the Network Coordinator  in
configuring  his system to provide an improved level of service to the
local nodes.

The Regional Coordinator also decided that the local  node  was  being
too  easily  annoyed,  in  that he was expecting services not normally
required of a Network Coordinator.  The local node was informed as  to
the true duties of a Network Coordinator, and was advised to lower his
expectations.













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4.1.5   The Case of the Busy Beaver4.1.5   The Case of the Busy Beaver

A  local node which was operated by a retail establishment was engaged
in  making  "bombing  runs"  to mail advertisements over FidoNet.  His
Network Coordinator felt annoyed and handling the outgoing traffic for
a commercial operation, and asked the local node to leave the network.

The local node applied to the Regional Coordinator,  and  was  granted
status as an independent node in his region.



4.1.6   The Case of the Sysop Twit4.1.6   The Case of the Sysop Twit

A  patron  of  various  local nodes had been roundly recognized by all
sysops as a twit.  The user obtained his own system,  became a  sysop,
and  applied  for  a  node number.  The Network Coordinator denied the
request.  No appeals were made.



4.1.7   The Case of the EchoMail Junkey key key4.1.7   The Case of the EchoMail Junkey key key

A  local  node  became  enamored  with  EchoMail  and  joined  several
conferences,  routing his outbound mail through his network.  He  then
started  an EchoMail conference of his own and began relaying EchoMail
between several systems, again routing it all through his network.

His Network Coordinator observed that network performance was becoming
seriously impaired.  The offending node was told to hold  it  down.  A
compromise  was  reached  whereby  much of the EchoMail traffic was no
longer routed through the network,  and routed EchoMail was limited to
twenty messages per night.  No appeals were made.



4.1.8   The Case of the Bouncing Board4.1.8   The Case of the Bouncing Board

A local user decided to establish a node to promote a worthy  charity.
The  machine  being  used  was  also used for various other activities
during the day,  and the sysop was often called  away.  His  coworkers
would  often  forget to bring the board up at the end of the day while
he was away,  so the node was often down  for  extended  periods.  The
Network Coordinator, on finding the node unable to receive mail, would
mark it as down.  The sysop would return,  restart the board,  and ask
to be reinstated as a node.

The Network Coordinator eventually decided that the sysop was not able
to maintain a reliable system,  and removed him  from  the  node  list
completely.  Future  requests  for  a  node number from the same sysop
were turned down.  No appeals were made.








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